Liberal Media

Tag Archive for science

American Ebola Patients Released From Hospital

ATLANTA—Kent Brantly and Nancy Writebol have recovered. The two American aid workers, who since early August had been receiving treatment for Ebola at Emory University Hospital, are being released—hospital officials in Atlanta cited multiple clean blood tests for both. Standing in front of a press conference this morning, Brantly simply said “I am thrilled to be […]



All You Can Eat

Adam Voorhes In January of this year, the first subject checked into the metabolic ward at the National Institutes of Health in Bethesda, Maryland, to participate in one of the most rigorous dietary studies ever devised. For eight weeks, he was forbidden to leave. He spent two days of each week inside tiny airtight rooms […]

How Scientists Upgraded Alvin Into a Superpowered Sub

Bryan Christie Design Deep-sea explorers and scientists have long relied on the Alvin submersible, based in Woods Hole, Massachusetts, to visit the abyssal depths. But after 50 years of diving everywhere from hydrothermal vents to the wreckage of the Titanic, it was ready for a makeover. Three years and $41 million later, Alvin is back […]



How Microscopic Ocean Life May Help Make It Rain

SAN FRANCISCO—Clouds can carry millions of pounds of water, but that doesn’t mean rain and snow just happen. Hundreds of thousands of water vapor molecules need to freeze together as ice before they are heavy enough to fall to the ground. But, the water molecules need a bit of dust or other microscopic matter to latch onto in order […]



Scientists Program Largest Swarm of Robots Ever

Alone, the simple little robot can’t do much, shuffling around on three vibrating tooth-pick legs. But working with 1,000 or more like-minded fellow bots, it becomes part of a swarm that can self-assemble into any two-dimensional shape. These are some of the first steps toward creating huge herds of tiny robots that form larger structures—including […]



What It Takes to Win the World’s Highest Computer Science Honor

[HTML1] One summer afternoon in 2001, while visiting relatives in India, Subhash Khot drifted into his default mode — quietly contemplating the limits of computation. For hours, no one could tell whether the third-year Princeton University graduate student was working or merely sinking deeper into the living-room couch. That night, he woke up, scribbled something […]