Liberal Media

Tag Archive for science

careers
about

The Cutest and Weirdest Wild Animal Incidents This Week

The Cutest and Weirdest Wild Animal Incidents This Week

This Week in Wild Animals for November 21, 2014 Starfish were deflating. Polar bears were going bald. Fur seals were raping penguins. A 400-pound tortoise named Benjamin Franklin made an appearance outside a Walmart. This Week in Wild Animals is a public service for human beings compiled by Jon Mooallem, author of the book Wild […]

The post The Cutest and Weirdest Wild Animal Incidents This Week appeared first on WIRED.



home
podcast
store

Surprising Study of Human Immune Responses Could Lead to Better Flu Vaccines

Surprising Study of Human Immune Responses Could Lead to Better Flu Vaccines

A new computer modeling study suggests the human immune system has a better memory than scientists had thought for strains of the flu it’s encountered in the past. In the future, the researchers say, it might be possible to exploit this to design better vaccines.

The post Surprising Study of Human Immune Responses Could Lead to Better Flu Vaccines appeared first on WIRED.



partner

Time Travel is Real. Here Are The People and Spacecraft Who Have Done It

Time Travel is Real. Here Are The People and Spacecraft Who Have Done It

Carl De Torres To get ahead in life, spend some time on the International Space Station. Why? Well, according to the theory of relativity, astronauts on the ISS age more slowly due to the spacecraft’s high orbital speed. It’s called time dilation, and it means that when they return they’re a bit younger than they […]

The post Time Travel is Real. Here Are The People and Spacecraft Who Have Done It appeared first on WIRED.



The Startup That Lets You Communicate from Beyond the Grave

The Startup That Lets You Communicate from Beyond the Grave

Christoph Niemann One way to imagine dying is like time travel, except instead of journeying into the future or seeing Ancient Rome, you go to eternity, see nothing, and never come back. We have no idea where people go when they die; it’s what makes death so scary and awful. But the sense that they […]

The post The Startup That Lets You Communicate from Beyond the Grave appeared first on WIRED.



international

The Tricky Ethics of Intergalactic Colonization

The Tricky Ethics of Intergalactic Colonization

Leif Podhajsky Zheng He! Zheng He! Is there a better icon for interstellar voyaging? Between 1405 and 1433, Zheng set out from China on massive naval expeditions that reached as far as Mecca and Mombasa, journeys with more than 300 vessels and 28,000 crew, excursions far bigger and longer than those of Columbus more than […]

The post The Tricky Ethics of Intergalactic Colonization appeared first on WIRED.



The Ugly Battle Over Who Really Discovered the First Earth-Like Planet

The Ugly Battle Over Who Really Discovered the First Earth-Like Planet

No one knows what the planet Gliese 667Cc looks like. We know that it is about 22 light-years from Earth, a journey of lifetimes upon lifetimes. But no one can say whether it is a world like ours, with oceans and life, cities and single-malt Scotch. Only a hint of a to-and-fro oscillation in the star it orbits, detectable by Earth’s most sensitive telescopes and spectrographs, lets astronomers say the planet exists at all. The planet is bigger than our world, perhaps made of rocks instead of gas, and within its star’s “habitable zone”—at a Goldilocks distance that ensures enough starlight to make liquid water possible but not so much as to nuke the planet clean.

The post The Ugly Battle Over Who Really Discovered the First Earth-Like Planet appeared first on WIRED.



faq

How a Superchilled Telescope Will Look Back at the Dawn of the Universe

How a Superchilled Telescope Will Look Back at the Dawn of the Universe

To see back in time, you need a massive telescope—one big enough to capture light from when the first galaxies were formed, 13.5 billion years ago. Astronomers are clamoring to see this light, so NASA is obliging them by building the James Webb Space Telescope. The Webb will operate 1 million miles from Earth in […]

The post How a Superchilled Telescope Will Look Back at the Dawn of the Universe appeared first on WIRED.



We All Might Be Living In An Infinite Hologram

We All Might Be Living In An Infinite Hologram

NASA Quarks and leptons, the building blocks of matter, are staggeringly small—less than an attometer (a billionth of a billionth of a meter) in diameter. But zoom in closer—a billion times more—past zeptometers and yoctometers, to where the units run out of names. Then keep going, a hundred million times smaller still, and you finally […]

The post We All Might Be Living In An Infinite Hologram appeared first on WIRED.



The Baffling and Beautiful Wormhole Between Branches of Math

The Baffling and Beautiful Wormhole Between Branches of Math

Onformative Math Geeks extol its beauty, even finding in it hints of a mysterious connectedness in the universe. It’s on tank tops and coffee mugs. Aliens, apparently, carve it into crop circles (in 8-bit binary code). It’s appeared on The Simpsons. Twice. What’s the deal with Euler’s identity? Basically, it’s an equation about numbers—specifically, those […]

The post The Baffling and Beautiful Wormhole Between Branches of Math appeared first on WIRED.



feed

A Guide to Flatland: What It’s Like to Live in Two Dimensions

A Guide to Flatland: What It’s Like to Live in Two Dimensions

Valero Doval Mathematician Ian Stewart wants us to see what he sees. Which is kind of a problem, because he’s accustomed to envisioning some pretty impossible shapes: snowflakes in fractional dimensions, hypercubes in 4-D, 11-dimensional superstrings. So when the University of Warwick professor and author writes about these freaky geometries, he relies on an analogy—a […]

The post A Guide to Flatland: What It’s Like to Live in Two Dimensions appeared first on WIRED.



copyright

How People’s Political Passions Distort Their Sense of Reality

How People’s Political Passions Distort Their Sense of Reality

Though people might disagree on how to solve a problem, they can at least agree that the problem exists. Or can they? A new study finds that deeply held beliefs can undermine rationality: when confronted with solutions that challenged deeply-held values, people may be inclined to disbelieve the problem.

The post How People’s Political Passions Distort Their Sense of Reality appeared first on WIRED.



notice
research
api